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London Business Matters

34 Your business February 2017 Thriving in 2017 – leading business teams through uncertain times As 2017 gets underway, it’s likely that the change and economic uncertainty predicted in the Chancellor’s 2016 Autumn Statement will impact business leaders and employees alike, creating ambiguity, pressures and stress in professional and personal lives. This is the time to ensure teams have the support required to perform at their very best so that they and the company are successful. My experience points to two key drivers of performance – well-being and engagement. Employees who are well and are fully engaged in their jobs, have been identified as ‘thriving’ as indicated in the Well-being and Engagement Framework (Grant & Spence 2012). Thriving employees are motivated, productive, positive forces. They have the energy and resilience to withstand changes and uncertainty. Well-being incorporates aspects of physical, emotional and psychological well-being, including being physically fit and healthy, sleeping well and having positive relations with others. The health of our managers and employees is crucial to their performance and impacts everyone from work colleagues, clients, and family relationships. In reality, many employees fall short of experiencing high wellbeing. They may come to work and function, but increasingly are quietly struggling with stress and health challenges. Most leading companies invest in developing the skills, knowledge and competencies of their leaders, but few help to build and sustain their capacity, energy and wellness which is often taken for granted. Engagement can be described as a state of high energy, strong involvement and high sense of commitment to the performance of work functions. Engaged employees go above and beyond and are willing to give discretionary effort. They bring their hearts and minds into their jobs. Factors influencing engagement include doing work that allows employees to use their strengths, a positive work environment, and having a career and development plan. Employees not working in their strengths zone are likely to be disengaged, don’t look forward to going to work, achieve less on a daily basis and have fewer positive and creative moments. Disengaged employees may coast along at work, just doing enough to get by or may become negative or cynical. Four keys to help business teams thrive 1. Communicate a clear vision: your vision for your business provides meaning and motivation for your team and a sense of connectedness in working towards a shared goal. Recognition and feedback will help leaders understand the impact they are having on achieving the Company goals. 2. Strength management: companies that embrace the idea of aligning people’s strengths and passions with the right projects and teams get amazing results in both employee commitment and productivity. Know your employees’ strengths and incorporate them in their work. By focusing on getting employees to do more of what they do well they’ll feel more engaged, confident, motivated to go the extra mile and inspired to deliver higher quality work. 3. Career planning: ensure team members have a career and development plan. The ability to develop, grow and progress in a job provides challenge and motivation that benefits not only the individual but also the company. 4. Effective communication: in uncertain times it’s important to share what you know and what you don’t know about how the company is affected. Silence just leads to speculation. State the facts in a balanced way and explain as far as you can the options and implications you are considering. Remember to check in with your team on a regular basis to see how they are feeling and respond accordingly. 5. Work/life balance: to be happy, productive, healthy and have recovery time, employees at all levels need work/life balance. Ensure employees take annual holidays, are able to attend important family events and consider curtailing business emails at weekends except in cases of emergency 6. Positive and healthy work environment: cultivate a positive climate, build positive relationships, facilitate positive communication and connect people to a positive vision. Encourage healthy behaviours such as holding walking meetings, offer standing desks, provide healthy snacks in meetings. Set a good example by making time to exercise and taking care of your own health and wellbeing. Carol Pearson is an accredited executive coach www.pearsonpractice.com by Carol Pearson Characteristics of thriving employees Engaged: Interested, highly motivated, productive Sense of purpose: Doing meaningful work Relationships: Feels strong bonds and connections Optimism: Optimistic yet realistic perspective Self-esteem: Confident, positive feelings about self Vitality: Healthy, energized, rested Autonomy: Independence, internal locus of control Positive emotions: Happy, grateful, joy, hope continued from page 25 have access to the skills its businesses need to thrive. It’s an idea that has now been backed by the London Mayor, a cross-party group of MPs and other business groups. On a crucial part of the post-Brexit agenda for London, LCCI has led the way. Resilience Alongside all this work our Capital 500 quarterly economic surveys continued, providing policy-makers with an authoritative signpost of the capital’s economic health. Now with nearly three years of data, the surveys reveal fascinating insights about the impact of Brexit, and shine a light on the resilience of our businesses. 2016 was a particularly busy year for LCCI’s influencers, but one not short of successes. No doubt 2017 will surprise us again but, whatever happens, LCCI will continue to make the case for London to be the best place in the world to setup, run and grow a business. Rob Griggs is head of the public affairs team at LCCI Beer for sale The contents of the historic Mortlake Brewery in Richmond, London, are to be sold via private treaty and online auction by auctioneer and valuer Eddisons in association with CBRE, drawing a line under the iconic site’s continuous use as a brewery since 1487. The Mortlake site, famous as the home of Watney’s Red Barrel and Pale Ale beers until the 1980s, was one of eight huge London breweries still operating in the mid ‘70s, which between them generated one in every five pints of beer drunk in Britain. For the past 20 years the brewery produced vast quantities of Budweiser, with more than 60,000 bottles of lager an hour processed by its bottling line for distribution in the UK and across Europe. The plant’s yearly brewing capacity was 235 million litres .D eveloper Reselton bought the brewery site in 2015 for £158 million. Dartmouth Capital Advisors are developing plans for a mixed scheme consisting of residential, community, recreational and commercial use on the site next to the River Thames. www.cbre.com Mortlake Brewery


London Business Matters
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