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London Business Matters

6 Brexit February 2017 What is the government plan for Brexit? On 17 January 2017, the Prime Minister presented a 12-point Brexit plan in which she outlined a ‘clean break’ for the Britain from the EU. She aimed to give ‘clarity and certainty’ to both businesses and the rest of the EU and she warned that a UK ‘half-in, half-out’ of the EU was not an option. The Prime Minister’s Brexit plan is to: 1. Provide certainty about the process of leaving the EU. 2. Allow the UK to take control of its own laws. Once the UK has left the EU, UK laws will be made in Westminster, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast. 3. Strengthen the Union between the four nations of the UK. 4. Deliver a practical solution that allows the maintenance of the Common Travel Area with the Republic of Ireland. 5. Control the number of people who come to Britain from the EU. 6. Protect rights for EU nationals in Britain and British nationals in the EU.  7. Retain and strengthen employee rights.  8. Leave the EU Single Market and gain free trade access to European markets through a new free trade agreement with the EU. 9. Build new trade agreements with other countries. 10. Make the UK the best place in the world for science and innovation. 11. Co-operate with other European countries in the fight against crime and terrorism. 12. Bring about an orderly Brexit with a phased process of implementation. The Prime Minister also pledged that both Houses of Parliament would vote on the final Brexit package once it has been agreed. What will be the impact of the Supreme Court Brexit ruling? On 24 January (just after LBM went to press) a panel of 11 Supreme Court justices will have decided whether to reject or allow a government appeal against a High Court ruling which blocked the royal prerogative being used to trigger the UK’s exit from the EU without Parliamentary approval. If they allowed the appeal, the government will be required to take a bill through Parliament before Article 50 is invoked. This could delay the Brexit proceedings although it is unlikely that they will be prevented altogether because the majority of MPs have indicated that they will support the moving of Article 50. Supreme Court to deliver Brexit ruling on 24 January n www.theguardian.com/ politics/2017/jan/18/supremecourt to-deliver-brexit-ruling-24- january Will the UK continue to have access to the Single Market post-Brexit? A key part of the Prime Minister’s Brexit strategy is for the UK to leave the Single Market. She would however strive for the freest possible trade with European countries. Brexit: UK to leave Single Market, says Theresa May n www.bbc.co.uk/news/ukpolitics 38641208 Brexit and the EU Single Market n www.lawyersforbritain.org/eudeal single-market.shtml What new trade agreements could the UK sign with other countries? The UK will be able to participate in new trade agreements with non-member countries from the day after exit. The process of negotiating new trade deals can be lengthy but Brexit Secretary David Davis is confident that the UK will sign “a lot” of free trade deals with countries around the world on the day it finally leaves the EU. “A LOT of things to sign” David Davis boasts of post-Brexit trade deals in April 2019 n www.express.co.uk/news/ politics/755343/Brexit-news- David-Davis-House-of-Commonsstatement free-trade-deals- April-2019 Lawyers for Britain – Brexit and international trade n www.lawyersforbritain.org/inttrade. shtml How will UK control immigration from the EU? The government’s inability to limit the numbers of immigrants from the EU and the consequent social pressures for many UK communities as a result of uncontrolled immigration contributed to a ‘Leave’ vote in last year’s In/Out Referendum. Ministers are said to be drawing up plans for a two-tier system of UK border controls for EU citizens as the government prepares to tighten migration rules in the wake of Brexit. The Prime Minister is considering a system based on work permits and new automated security checks for EU citizens travelling to the UK. Brexit: Immigration controls will not be up for debate in EU ‘divorce’ talks, says David Davis n www.independent.co.uk/news/ uk/politics/brexit-david-davisrules out-immigration-controls-eunegotiations a7476376.html UK work permits at heart of Brexit immigration plan n www.ft.com/content/031d6ae6- dbf2-11e6-9d7c-be108f1c1dce Next steps – key Brexit dates • 24 January 2017: Supreme Court delivers ruling on whether the PM has the power to trigger Article 50 using a royal prerogative, rather than by an Act of Parliament. • 31 March 2017: Deadline set by the Prime Minister for invoking Article 50 by notifying the European Council of the UK’s intention to leave the EU. • 30 September 2018: Date by which EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, wants to finalise the terms of Britain’s exit from the EU. • 31 March 2019: Date by which the Prime Minster wants to conclude Brexit negotiations. • May 2019? The UK formally leaves the EU after Brexit is ratified by all other EU Member States. ARE YOU READY FOR THE LEVY? The Apprenticeship Levy is a new government initiative coming into place from April 2017. The aim is to improve and develop new vocational skills, to further increase the quality and quantity of apprenticeships across England. The government has committed to 3 million apprenticeship starts in England by 2020. This levy will support both new apprenticeships along with upskilling the existing workforce and aims to give something back to employers who are proactive about training apprentices. Free2Learn at Work is a pioneering organisation with a wealth of experience in training, recruitment and developing the next generation of business. Our team of specialists are ready to help employers understand more about the Apprenticeship Levy and how best to prepare for it. Book your free consultation with Free2Learn at Work today and discover what we can do for you. Matt.harvey@free2learn.org.uk 01302 373003 www.free2learn.org.uk Click/tap for more info


London Business Matters
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